2018 Workshop Descriptions

Workshops during the 2018 fair are happening in three sessions. Full descriptions are below the schedule, and are organized alphabetically within the different sessions. Click on the sessions below to see all the workshops within those sessions.

Workshop Schedule and Rooms

Time Title Presenter Room
Session I:
Morning
( 9:00 -10:15)
Afrofuturism and the Urban Classroom Sean Golden, Career Pathways Public Charter School 2
Authentic Student Partnership: Co-Creating Inclusive Schools Seiji Eicher (Student Engagement and Advancement Board (SEAB) 6
Class Hacks Equity Focused Book Club for Disruptive Educators Jen Goepfert, Cristina Benz and Kara Cisco 3 and 4
Design Thinking: Students as Changemakers Erica Ahlgren, Mallory Tuominen KAYSC
Ending the Minneapolis School to Prison Pipeline: Police in Our Schools William W Smith IV, Nancy A Heitzeg, St Catherine University Discovery Hall
Is This Justice? Juvenile Justice vs. Restorative Justice Franklin Library 4-H 8
Non-Intervention as Racism: Findings of a University Partnership for Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Pass the NES Basic Skills Exams Nicholas D. Hartlep, George Omboga, René Antrop-González, Metropolitan State University 5
Reading the World: Rigor and Social Justice in the Classroom Ryan Williams-Virden, Ian McLaughlin, Re-Imagine Education 7
Reconstructing our storytelling of sciences Alaina Szostkowski, Siddharth B.I. 9
Using the Pod Model as a Response to Sexual Violence Kristen A 10
What is Radical Professional Development? Sarah Garton 11
Who decides what’s important?: Youth led research as an inversion of traditional schooling Ryan Oto – UMN/Brooklyn Center HS 12
Session II
Noontime
(12:00-12:45/1/1:15)
caught between a rock and a white place Act On It 2
Challenging Islamophobia through Theatre Arts Maria Asp, Tessa Flynn Henderson, Children’s Theatre Company Auditorium
Educators Against Incarceration: Joining Our Struggles? Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee 8
Equitable Access to Teachers of Color: Students Deserve More than Crumbs Violeta Hernandez and Paul Spies 10
Getting Cops out of Minneapolis Schools! Young Peoples Action Coalition 5 and 6
Invasion of the Pod People! Communities Responding to Violence TK, Twin Cities Transformative Justice 9
Mapping Prejudice Maggie Mills 3 and 4
Our People, Our Hystory Isaac Martin 7
Science for the People: Join a movement of activist scientists! Mallory Mitchell, Julia Brokaw, Siddharth B.I. 11
SJEM Organizer training 12
Session III
Afternoon
(2:00-3:15)
Critical Reading, Critical Thinking: Dismantling Power Structures in the Classroom Susan Woehrle, Sanford Middle School & Franklin Library 11
Fed up with Colorism! Youth Research Team- KAYSC, Science Museum of MN Argon
Make Love Spread Love: working towards a sex positive school culture Rosey Lowe, Z Townsend, Ro Lin, Allegra Wyatt 12
Mediocrity in the name of Diversity: Why To be Black, brilliant, and fiercely independent is Unpalatable in MN Education Don Allen, Lennie Chism 8
Menticide, the illusion of inclusion Timothy R. Warren 7
MPD150: A Historical Approach To Police Abolition MPD150 members Discovery Hall
My People Gotta Eat! Ieshia Dabbs, Jessie McDaniel, Appetite for Change 3 and 4
Supporting Bi+ Youth Sally Corbett, Bisexual Organizing Project 2
The Effects of Mental Health on SEL (Social Emotional Learning). Latisha Eadd, Aiysha Mustapha, Sonnesyn Elementary School 5 and 6
This Isn’t Some Damn Game Company Andrew Butts, Aaron Hanson, Adam Bauer (University of Minnesota) 9
Triumph and Tragedy in History: A Guide to Social Justice Research and Topics Anja Witek. East Side Freedom Library KAYSC
Weaving community: Embodying, Re-imagining and Expanding Comunidad Maria Schwedhelm and Veronica Quillien, Language Attitude 10

Workshop Descriptions by Session

Session I: 9:00 – 10:15 AM

Afrofuturism and the Urban Classroom Sean Golden, Career Pathways Public Charter School

The workshop will be designed to inform the audience how to incorporate Afrofuturism in their classroom. First by defining afrofuturism, then by rethinking texts, and how to use texts schools already have and use an afrofuturism lens to analyze the work. The workshop will include: a) generating a list of poc authors and text with the audience b) how I’ve incorporated afrofuturism in the classroom c) what is next, so how to make sure the authors are being read throughout urban school districts, and how it will help our students if these books are in the curriculum.

Authentic Student Partnership: Co-Creating Inclusive Schools  Student Engagement and Advancement Board (SEAB), SPPS Community Education, Seiji Eicher

Learn how students (SEAB members) are partnering with St. Paul Public Schools Administration and School Board to shift thinking and produce change. Dialog on how to co-create inclusive, justice-oriented schools using SPPS’s Student Engagement and Advancement Board’s professional development video, “A Place Where Everyone Thrives.”

Class Hacks Equity Focused Book Club for Disruptive Educators Jen Goepfert, Cristina Benz and Kara Cisco

Class Hacks is a book club for disruptive educators interested in the principles of social justice, equity and rejecting the status quo in our schools. We are an inter-district book club, with members ranging from early childhood all the way to post-secondary learning, educators who work all over the metro and teach myriad subjects.

In this session, we will replicate a typical Class Hacks book discussion using our protocol, but it’s okay if you haven’t read the book! We will be discussing Pushout by Monique Norris, and will have quotes and passages of the book on hand for participants unfamiliar with the book. ”

Design Thinking: Students as Changemakers Erica Ahlgren, Mallory Tuominen    

Knowledge to Action (K2A) is a design thinking framework that provides all students with a unique opportunity to demonstrate their creativity, innovative thinking and drive to convert their learning into positive action that has impact at the personal, local and/or global level. In this interactive session, participants will engage as learners in a process that facilitates student driven research and inquiry, and results in an action oriented solution to a glocal (global to local) issue.

Ending the Minneapolis School to Prison Pipeline: Police in Our Schools William W Smith IV ( Parent) St Catherine University, Nancy A Heitzeg, St Catherine University

This session will seek input from students, parents and teachers/school personnel and offer a space for discussion of alternatives to police in schools, and to imagine new visions of safety that do not rely on police, and create strategies for continuing efforts toward police-free Twin City schools. This workshop will provide an overview of the school to prison pipeline (stpp) nationally and in Minneapolis with special attention to racial disparity in suspension/expulsion and arrest at school. It will also highlight recent local attention to problems with SROs/police in Twin Cities schools and efforts to remove them. This session will seek input from students, parents and teachers/school personnel, offer a space for discussion of alternatives to police in schools, imagine new visions of safety that do not rely on police, and create strategies for continuing efforts toward police-free Twin City schools

Is This Justice?  Juvenile Justice vs. Restorative Justice  Amin Hassan, Habso Khalif,  Muhsin Aidid, Hibaaq Ibrahim, Mohamed Mohamud, Abdullahi Bashir, Khalid Hanafi, Franklin Library 4-H

Have you ever wondered how the juvenile justice system could be changed?  Do you know the problems with the justice system right now with its major racial disparities?  Have you ever made a mistake and gotten a second chance? What difference did it make for you? In this workshop, we will compare the juvenile justice and restorative justice systems and the differences between them.   We will address the conditions for youth in detention centers, implicit bias, racial and educational disparities, and the different outcomes of these two systems. Presenters will share their stories and personal experiences with these systems.  People attending this workshop will also have an opportunity to share knowledge and experiences, and explore what kind of changes we can make in schools and in the community to make a more transformative system.

Non-Intervention as Racism: Findings of a University Partnership for Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Pass the NES Basic Skills Exams Nicholas D. Hartlep, George Omboga, René Antrop-González, Metropolitan State University

This interactive session will share what Metropolitan State University and Augsburg University are doing to help pre-service teachers pass the NES Essential Academic Skills Mathematics subtest. The three Metropolitan State University presenters argue that the NES work pushes back against the white supremacy that is testing. Because these tests serve as gatekeepers to the profession, getting people of color and Native Americans to pass them is resistance through success.

Reading the World: Rigor and Social Justice in the Classroom Ryan Williams-Virden, Ian McLaughlin, Re-Imagine Education

“It is not uncommon to hear folks claim that “education is the key” to the future. We don’t disagree and believe that classrooms need to be spaces where critical thinking and radical truth-telling are nurtured so that students are equipped to confront the most pressing issues of our time with the worldview and lens necessary. This is easier said than done, especially in an era where success is often exclusively measured via test scores. Schools often make the mistake of falling into the either/or of tests or equity. This workshop directly challenges that frame and discusses the importance and power of incorporating rigor and equity in every lesson. Participants will be introduced to steps for crafting rigorous lesson plans and units that center issues of white supremacy, white privilege, and the intersections with gender, class, and other forms of oppression. ”

Reconstructing our storytelling of sciences Alaina Szostkowski – Great River School

Siddharth B.I. – University of Minnesota

Science and other STEM disciplines are considered a “healthy choice” on the schooling menu because studying them leads to good jobs and economic growth. But what gets called scientific has long excluded knowledge and experiences of indigenous people, people of color, and women. We believe that storytelling can upset harmful boundaries drawn by

canonical science. Narrative practices can reconnect learners with people, emotions, and histories so that science classrooms become more positive learning environments. This workshop builds off previous SJEF sessions and collaborations with scientists and graduate students. We will talk about the ethics of telling and re-telling stories across classrooms from elementary to graduate school. We will share activities and resources for developing personal science stories; diversifying histories of science; examining boundaries between science and religion, and rethinking scientific narratives of the natural world. We also hope to organize informal gatherings in the months following the fair where science storytelling practitioners can share with one another and grow.

Using the Pod Model as a Response to Sexual Violence Kristen A

Survivors of sexual violence deserve healing and justice. In this workshop, survivors and allies learn how to come together as a group centered on the survivor to find healing, care, and transformation. Rejecting the isolation and retraumatization usually associated with the current legal system, pod model helps survivors, supported by their friends, to find healing that speaks to them and reclaim their agency. Some survivors have also chosen to work with their pod to hold harm doers as well as bystanders and communities accountable to begin the process of transformation of those people and communities. This workshop offers participants a new way of looking at community and justice that can work without engaging law enforcement and the prison system. Twin Cities IWW-GDC. twincitiesgdc.org

What is Radical Professional Development? Sarah Garton, Social Justice Education Fair + Free Minds Free People Local Planning Committee, Great River School teacher

Come brainstorm what you want your professional development to give you as a radical educator + what you wish your educators were learning about! Bosses usually choose for educators, sometimes inducing lots of eye rolls, checking out and wishing we could determine for ourselves what we want to work on and learn about. Dream about what a day of radical professional development would look like, and it will inform the first day of Free Minds, Free People, the annual conference hosted by Education for Liberation Network that will be here in the Twin Cities Summer 2019! Learn more about FMFP, the planning happening so far and perhaps sign up to get involved in the local planning committee.

This is more explicitly a space for educators but youth would be welcome and could be directly connected to organizing for FMFP.”

Who decides what’s important?: Youth led research as an inversion of traditional schooling Ryan Oto – UMN/Brooklyn Center HS

This workshop will describe a recent youth participatory action research (YPAR) project at a twin cities school. Aimed at uncovering how racism looked and felt in the context of the community, 5 youth researchers explored the differences between racist, non-racist, and anti-racist work that teachers, students, and administrators engaged.

While this presentation will not talk directly about the findings of that project (as it is the work of the youth researchers), it will focus on YPAR as a disruptive and critical move in communities that shift who decides what is important from conventional authority figures to community stake holders. This presentation will address the productive aspects of the process along with the challenges that come with implementing YPAR. A facilitated discussion will follow to explore ways that YPAR work can be done to sustain community needs at the foreground of schooling conversations.


Session II: Noontime: 12:00 – 12:45/1:00/1:15 PM

Resisting the menu of schooling: Art, activities and organizing

caught between a rock and a white place Nadrat Amos Armstrong high school Dare 2 be real/ racial justice club

In this workshop we’d like to explore challenges of being a brown or black student in an education system that not only advertises but practices whiteness as the benchmark for success and scholarship. There are  issues of inclusion for Black and Brown students at predominantly White schools and lack of funding and resources at predominately Black and Brown schools. We’ll talk about the difficult decision that must be made by students where they have to choose a lesser of two evils:uncomfortable schooling environments or sub par education. We’ll also challenge the uncontested yet hardly spoken about notion that Students of color need to choose a lesser of two evils like the aforementioned two when in the education system.

Challenging Islamophobia through Theatre Arts Maria Asp, Tessa Flynn Henderson/ Neighborhood Bridges Program Children’s Theatre Company

What happens when stereotypes go unchecked? How does media feed the Islamophobia industry? How can Muslim Americans or marginalized students feel like empowered contributors in a white dominant society with hostile narratives rising against them?

Through storytelling, creative writing and theatre participants will embody stories through a critical literacy lens.

Children’s Theatre Company’s Neighborhood Bridges Program uses of theatre, storytelling, and creative writing to empower students to be the narrators of their own lives. Bridges participants examine stories through critical literacy, practicing agency to transform narratives in the interest of addressing social injustices and inequities with the future leaders of tomorrow.

Bridges is creating new curriculum (stories and strategies) that reflect the resiliency of our Muslim community and center Muslim voices to create a better cultural understanding between Muslim and non- Muslim students. This curriculum responds to the confluence of two factors: the influx of Somali American students in Bridges classrooms and the fear and misunderstanding of Muslims in the Twin Cities and beyond. In response to the stories, and in line with Neighborhood Bridges pedagogy, participants will engage in language and creative writing activities, discuss character and themes, and produce scenes that bring these stories to life.

Educators Against Incarceration: Joining Our Struggles? Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee

This last year saw mass strikes of K12 educators – and prisoners. What are the points of connection between our struggles? How can we as educators create an alliance to improve our schools and end mass incarceration?

The Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee is prison organizing committee of the Industrial Workers of the World. We have over 600 members inside prisons and outside chapters in a dozen cities in the US.

Equitable Access to Teachers of Color: Students Deserve More than Crumbs Violeta Hernandez Espinosa, MN Council on Latino Affairs & Paul Spies, Metro State Univ. and Coalition to Increase Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers in MN.

In 2016, the Coalition to Increase Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers in MN (www.tocaimn.com) successfully advocated for legislation to amend state law so that students shall have “equitable access to effective and diverse teachers” who reflect the diversity of students in schools.  In 2017 the Minnesota Council on Latino Affairs and the Coalition successfully led an effort to change several state programs to get teachers of color listed as a shortage area and get modest increases in state spending for such programs. However, state investment up to now has been like crumbs given to a starving population.  The result: Only 4% of all teachers in the state are of color or American Indian. This session will inform participants what has been achieved at the Legislature and what is planned for the upcoming legislative session. It will engage participants in discussing ways to mobilize youth, college students, parents, educators and communities to advocate for equitable access to diverse teachers at the state and local level.

Getting Cops out of Minneapolis Schools! Helen Forsythe, Abdoulie Ceesay, Young Peoples Action Coalition

Join other Minneapolis high school students in a conversation about School Resources Officers (cops in schools), how to get them out and how to implement things that actually do make our schools a safer and more inspiring learning environment.

Invasion of the Pod People! Communities Responding to Violence TK, Twin Cities Transformative Justice

The pod people are… invading! In order to support our friends and people we care about, we have to come together and respond to violence in our community. This workshop will focus on the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective’s idea of a pod–what it is, who’s a part of yours, and how it will help us dig up the root causes of violence in our communities.

Mapping Prejudice Marguerite Mills, Mapping Prejudice & University of Minnesota

Workshopping a curriculum teaching students about the hidden history of racial covenants and structural racism in Minneapolis (mappingprejudice.org)

Our People, Our Hystory Isaac Martin

This workshop is focused on highlighting the hystory of indigenous communities and people of color. Why its important for youth to know the hystories and struggles of the communities that they come from, as well as that of indigenous communities and other communities of color that are not their own. And why its important that our hystories are taught by our people from our communities. And we will share how we are building a campaign for ethnic studies classes at twin cities high schools.

Science for the People: Join a movement of activist scientists! Mallory Mitchell, Julia Brokaw, Siddharth B.I.

When you think of standard science outreach, what comes to mind? Likely it’s something along the lines of “us scientists who know everything are giving knowledge to y’all who don’t.” We want to bite that hand. Flip that paradigm. Challenge that status quo. This is one of many transformations Science for the People is working toward.

Science for the People is a radical organization that sees science, society, and power as intimately and inherently linked. Our work is rooted in challenging existing status quos in science institutions, cultivating a learning community around political considerations of science, connecting scientists to local and regional social movements, and ultimately reimagining a better science that works for all people.

We invite everyone to a collective brainstorming session around how this movement can be relevant to K-12 education.

How can scientists work in solidarity with students and educators?

How can youth be involved in SftP?

How do we bridge interdisciplinary critical thought early on (specifically in K-12 education)?

https://www.facebook.com/SftPTC/ ; scienceforthepeople.twincities@gmail.com

SJEM Organizer Training


Session III: Afternoon: 2:00 – 3:15 PM

Critical Reading, Critical Thinking: Dismantling Power Structures in the Classroom Susan Woehrle, Sanford Middle School & Franklin Library

Learn how to question the assumptions behind the media you consume and the lessons we teach children and teach them to do the same.

I will present several headlines, quotes and clips from news stories and ask people to identify the underlying assumptions, or premises, behind their storytelling.

I will share a toolkit that can then be used to dismantle power structures created by discursive problems our society overlooks every day. Whether or not they decide to implement that toolkit is up to them. Teaching students critical thinking makes them more difficult to control.

Fed up with Colorism! Youth Research Team- KAYSC, Science Museum of MN

Our workshop will be talking about colorism and how it affects our communities and our daily lives. We will be including discussions and visual representations. Our intention for this is to educate people from all walks of life so they know how to combat colorism if they encounter it when they see it.

#EndColorism and #BiteColorism

Make Love Spread Love: working towards a sex positive school culture Rosey Lowe, Z Townsend, Ro Lin, Allegra Wyatt

Imagine a world where showing your love for other people was a crime; where knowledge of how your own body works was tabooed; and where invisible categories divided and ruled your life. This world is the reality of schools today, where administrative rules and school culture combine to ban talking about sex. This toxic environment harms not only students, but the entire population at large.

We want to open a space to talk about sex positivity: What could it look like in schools? How could we get there?

This workshop will be discussion and activity based

CW: This workshop will include discussions of sex, consent, pornography, and sexual assault in various forms. Such topics may be triggering for certain attendees. Please consider your own standing before attending.

Mediocrity in the name of Diversity: Why To be Black, brilliant, and fiercely independent is Unpalatable in MN Education Don Allen, M.A. Ed./MAT – Founder: Teacher Training Watch; Lennie Chism, B.A., Elementary/High School Educator and Business Owner/Inventor

This workshop and discussion will take an in-depth look and the continued obstruction of teachers of color, especially Black-males in Minnesota’s K-12 public/charter classrooms. We have data and evidence that points not only to local school districts, but also teacher training programs that use the word ‘diversity’, but it only applies if that person of color is palatable.  Schools in Minnesota that have over 40% scholars of color with no Black or Native American educators. This is part of the ‘Con of Diversity,’ when tenure rules written in the 1950s, and updated in the 1970s are antiquated but protect a class of educators that have low expectations for students in urban settings. The MDE is disproportionate in hiring people of color in every department. This is one of the main reasons we have ‘gaps’ because the people deciding the curriculum cannot relate to the population. More damning, the Professional Educators Licensing and Standards Board have NO Black-American Minnesotans appointed to the board. How can a board understand the needs of diverse students if the board that governs the licensing of teachers does not consider the research about qualified candidates to make sure Minnesota scholars are the best they can be?

Menticide, the illusion of inclusion – Timothy R. Warren

In our nation’s k-12 education system our African American male students are lagging behind. Race and ethnicity have become predictors of grades, test scores, and other measure of academic skill or knowledge. In addition the choice and opportunity for post-secondary opportunities are limited. For those students that do attend post-secondary institutions they realize that education is not the great equalizer. Our education system has become an apparatus of Mentacide. Mentacide has the effect of rendering the Black/African psyche void. Mentacide is also defined as the “deliberate and systematic destruction of a groups mind with the ultimate objective being the extirpation of the group” (Wright 1976). Mentacide, according to Daudi Ajani ya Azibo is defined as the raping of the mind and spirit of a Black family.

MPD150: A Historical Approach To Police Abolition MPD150 members

In 2017, the Minneapolis Police Department turned 150 years old. 150 years of racist brutality, unchecked corruption, and total unaccountability. For much of that history, the Twin Cities community has been resisting MPD aggression and pushing for police reform. Civilian review boards, officer diversity, body cameras – we’ve tried many things to protect Black life from police officers in Minneapolis, and none of them have worked. In 2017, a group called MPD150 released a report on the first 150 years of the Minneapolis Police Department calling for the abolition of the department. In this workshop, we’ll take a look at the history of the MPD, failed attempts at reform, and the possibility of a brighter future in Minneapolis – one without police.

My People Gotta Eat! eshia Dabbs, Department of YTOP, Youth Leader at AFC; Jessie McDaniel, Department of YTOP, Youth founder at AFCI

Appetite For Change (AFC) was founded in 2011 and launched after coming together with 400 members of North Minneapolis to discuss the foodscape, while cooking a meal together. The community reported that they were interested in continuing to cook, eat and talk about other issues, learning to grow and sell produce, making change within the policies that affect the lives of the people who live in urban areas.  This process of cooking, eating and talking about the change we wanted to see became our flagship program “Community Cooks”. This community organizing tool begun to give an unexpected number of youth a place to come to and operate their power to do something about the issues that affected them the most. While doing so, the youth realized there was not a place to get any fresh or real food, they did have easy access to 38 fast food restaurants, from Washburn to I-94 on West Broadway. With the youth’s minds in full effect, the Urban Youth from AFC fought back by have informational Community Cooks events, Fundraisers, Speaking engagements, engaging over 100 North Minneapolis youth in a food movement, and producing the viral hit “Grow Food”. We would like to present how to use the social sustenance from cooking together to blur the lines between diverse communities, because what you put in is what you get out.

Supporting Bi+ Youth Sally Corbett, Bisexual Organizing Project

“Supporting Bi+ Youth” will give educators and other adult allies the knowledge and skills to support bi+ (bisexual, pansexual, omnisexual, queer, fluid, unlabeled, and otherwise non-monosexual) youth in their unique struggles, and meet their specific needs. Recent studies have found that 49% percent of LGBTQ+ youth identify as bi+, and that this population also experiences the highest rates of bullying and harassment, mental and physical health disparities, and struggles with family and community acceptance. This workshop will delve into what biphobia is, how it is ingrained in our society, and how we unlearn it. The health and safety of our bi+ youth depends on the dismantling of biphobia in our institutions, our organizations, our classrooms, our homes, and ourselves. We will explore a bit of “Bi+ 101”, biphobia, bi erasure and bi invisibility, who our bi+ youth are, health disparities, and actionable solutions.

The Effects of Mental Health on SEL (Social Emotional Learning). Latisha Eaddy SEL Teacher & Aiysha Mustapha, Special Education Specialist at  Sonnesyn Elementary School

This is a presentation and facilitated discussion about the connections between Mental Health and its role within Social Emotional Learning.

This Isn’t Some Damn Game Company Andrew Butts, Aaron Hanson, Adam Bauer (University of Minnesota)

A presentation of a few different policy-related, tabletop game concepts that are at various stages of development, in order to seek feedback. The three games are themed around poverty & inequality, social justice, and environmental sustainability.

Triumph and Tragedy in History: A Guide to Social Justice Research and Topics Anja Witek.  East Side Freedom Library.

NOTE: This workshop is not affiliated with the MNHD program, but is put on by the research assistants at the East Side Freedom Library in Saint Paul.

The History Day program is a powerful tool for teaching outside the usual curriculum, since students choose their own topics to research.

In this workshop, we will discuss the theme of Triumph and Tragedy, specifically with an eye towards topics around social justice issues.

National History Day is an inter-disciplinary research project for students in grades 6-12. Students choose a topic that relates to an annual theme, research that topic, and present their research in one of five presentation categories: Research Paper, Exhibit, Documentary, Performance, or Website. Students may then enter their projects into History Day competitions at school, regional, state, and national levels. This year’s theme is Triumph and Tragedy in History.

The East Side Freedom Library (eastsidefreedomlibrary.org) partners with History Day to provide students with expert advice on topic selection and research. The collections are organized around labor, immigration, African American, and social justice movement history and include not just historical studies but also poetry, fiction, visual art, drama, music, film, and autobiographies.  We have over 18,000 books in these areas.

Weaving community: Embodying, Re-imagining and Expanding Comunidad Maria Schwedhelm and Veronica Quillien, Language Attitude

A “living theory” and a way of living, the term comunalidad emerged from social justice movements in Oaxaca, Mexico, as members of different Indigenous communities came together to reflect about who they are and how to move together towards a common goal. It goes beyond the common definition of “community” as an “aggregate of people” to emphasize the relationality between people and between people and Nature. That strong social fabric represents every day resistance and forms the basis of reconstructing a future where we are feeding ourselves. Through collective reflections with our bodies and through the arts, we will think about the meaning of “community” and reflect about what comunalidad means for us, our people and our context. We will think about who we are, what brings us together and how we can use the power of community to resist the hand that feeds us and help each other imagine and move towards new futures.

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