All posts by erindyke

Youth Activists Summit at the 3rd Annual TC Social Justice Education Fair

youth activists summit flier

The Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair exists to bring together educators, students, parents, and communities from across the Twin Cities Metro to collaborate, network, and organize social justice in education.

The Youth Activist Summit is about creating space at the 3rd Annual TC Social Justice Education Fair for youth to speak their truth, to learn from their peers from Philly and the Twin Cities, and to gain skills in order to build power to transform their schools. It will include free Youth Activists Summit t-shirts, lunch, a keynote presentation by Philadelphia Student Union, two workshop sessions, and art and networking spaces. The Fair is entirely FREE.

Youth may register themselves or adults may register a group of youth by visiting: https://tcedfair.org/registration/

Schedule:
Young Activists Summit Registration: 11:30am
Lunch & Performances: 12:20pm to 1:05pm
Keynote, Philadelphia Student Union: 1:15pm to 2:15pm
Workshop Session: 2:25pm to 3:40pm
Workshop Session: 3:50pm to 5:05pm
Closing Gathering

Examples of workshop options:
Q&A with Philly Student Union
I’m More Than a Test Score: Putting Equity to the Test
Dismantling the School-to-Prison Pipeline
Access to Higher Ed for Undocumented Students
Staying True to You (by Whose Diversity? at UMN)

Fore more info visit tcedfair.org or https://www.facebook.com/events/280702188786586/

A Fundraiser for the 3rd Annual Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair!

Sunday, October 5
7pm to 10pm

The Third Place Gallery
3730 Chicago Ave S
Studio B
Minneapolis, MN

*Poster designed by Keno Evol

Performances by:
The Lioness
Misfit the Emcee
Keno Evol
MC Longshot
Fatima Camera
Chava Gaberell
Rebecca Song
Tiara Bellaphant
Rodrigo Sanchez
Tamera Larkins
I.B.E.

$5-15 Suggested Donation

More info:
The Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair exists to bring together educators. students, parents, and communities from across the Twin Cities Metro to collaborate, network, and organize social justice in education. This year’s Fair will take place on October 17, 2014 from 8:00-5:30 at Ben Mays International Magnet School in St. Paul. For more info and to register or request for tabling, visit tcedfair.org!

Register for the Twin Cities Annual Social Justice Education Fair!

Register for the 3rd Annual TC Social Justice Ed Fair:

 

Register for this year’s fair here  on our website
 

Friday, October 17, 2014
8:30am-5:00pm
Ben Mays International
Magnet School, 560 Concordia Ave,
St Paul, MN 55103
 
Up to 8 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) offered. As always, the fair is free to attend, with a light breakfast, snacks, lunch, and childcare provided.
 
Stay tuned this coming week for exciting workshop and schedule announcements.
 
Keynote: Philadelphia Student Union
logoClear.PSU
 
We are excited to announce that members of the Philadelphia Student Union will be joining us to share their experiences around creating a youth-led movement to fight for educational justice in their city.
 
Help us meet our fundraising needs
Based on last year’s costs, our expected increase in size this year, and with supporting our exciting keynote speakers, we are estimating that we will need to raise at least $2,000 in addition to other fundraising we are engaged in. Please contribute what you can to help us reach our goal and to continue to make the fair free to attend with nutritious meals and childcare provided for all!
 
Please share this indie-go-go campaign with others – we have a ways to go yet to reach our goal!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair Organizing Committee
Website: tcedfair.org
               (612) 787-2272
Donate:   indiegogo.com

Keynote Announcement: Philadelphia Student Union

Keynote Announcement: Philadelphia Student Union

logoClear.PSU
 
We are excited to announce that members of the Philadelphia Student Union will be joining us to share their experiences around creating a youth-led movement to fight for educational justice in their city. Through running school-based, citywide, and statewide campaigns around issues such as prison-like school environments, wide-spread school closings and staff cutbacks, lack of resources, high staff turnover rates, and suppression of youth leadership, PSU has been a forced to be reckoned with for 20 years! We are extremely excited and humbled that members of PSU are traveling to the Twin Cities to share their work with us and to participate in the Fair. 

 

Help us meet our fundraising needs

 

Based on last year’s costs, our expected increase in size this year, and with supporting our exciting keynote speakers, we are estimating that we will need to raise at least $2,000 in addition to other fundraising we are engaged in. Please contribute what you can to help us reach our goal and to continue to make the fair free to attend with nutritious meals and childcare provided for all!
 
Please share this indie-go-go campaign with others – We have a ways to go yet to reach our goal!
 
Only three days left to submit your workshop proposals!
 
We’re looking for quality workshops of all types by students, parents, school staff, educators, after school workers, and community members for this year’s theme “Nothing About Us, Without Us, Is For Us”. Check out our website for more information about the theme and to submit a proposal.
 
**Proposals are due by Monday, August 31, 2014** 
 
We encourage folks to submit their proposals by the deadline. If for some reason you or your group are unable to submit a proposal before this deadline and would like an extension, please let us know. 
 
Stay tuned for more exciting announcements about space (we’ll be in St. Paul this year!), awards, and other exciting news leading up to the fair.
 
Sincerely,
 
The Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair Organizing Committee
 
Website: tcedfair.org
               (612) 787-2272
Donate:   indiegogo.com, search for “Fund the Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair”

Second Youth Track Meet-Up this coming Tuesday at Penumbra – all (but especially young folks) are welcome to attend

We are excited to host the second Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair Youth Track Meet-Up next week. Please join us if you are interested in helping to plan and recruit youth-led workshops and creatively vision other activities and meaningful spaces for youth at this year’s fair. All folks but especially young people of color, young queer folks and young women are welcome here!

Tuesday, August 26, 2014
Penumbra Theater
270 N Kent St, St Paul, MN 55102
6:30pm-8:30pm
RSVP Here

Hope to see you there!!

Fair Updates: Youth Track Meet-up and much more!

Youth Track Meet-Up Next Week:

We are excited to host a Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair Youth Track Social Gathering next week. Please join us if you are interested in helping to plan and recruit youth-led workshops and creatively vision other activities and meaningful spaces for youth at this year’s fair. Young people of color, young queer folks and women are especially welcome here!

Thursday, August 14, 2014
Neighborhoods Organizing for Change
911 W. Broadway Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55411
4:00-6:00pm
Dinner provided
RSVP Here

At last week’s campaigns meet-up, educators, students, community organizers, and parents came together to discuss a wide variety of campaigns and organizing in the Twin Cities social justice education movement. Stay tuned for more information about upcoming meet-ups for the campaigns track and parent track!

Help us meet our fundraising needs for this year’s fair!

Based on last year’s costs and our expected increase in size this year, we are estimating that we will need to raise $2,000 in addition to other fundraising we are engaged in. Please contribute what you can to help us reach our goal and to continue to make the fair free to attend with meals and childcare provided for all!

Please share this indie-go-go campaign with others!

We are now accepting workshop proposals:

We’re looking for quality workshops of all types by students, parents, school staff, educators, after school workers, and community members for this year’s theme *Nothing About Us Without Us Is For Us*. Check out our website for more information about the theme and to submit a proposal.

Don’t forget to submit a workshop proposal for this year’s fair! Proposals are due by August 31, 2014.

And, check out ‘Unchain Our Children’ community event next week:

unchainus.event

Call for Workshop Proposals: 3rd Annual Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair

Dear students, parents and caregivers, educators, and community members,
 
We are now accepting workshop proposals:
We’re looking for quality workshops of all types by students, parents, school staff, educators, after school workers, and community members for this year’s theme *Nothing About Us Without Us Is For Us*. Go to our Call for Proposals page to read more about our theme and to submit a proposal.
***Proposals are due by August 31, 2014***
New tracks this year at the Twin Cities 3rd Annual Social Justice Education Fair:
 
We are excited to announce that this year’s fair will include tracks that will specifically support youth,parents, and nascent or ongoing educational justice campaigns. We are planning larger community meet-ups leading up to the fair in order to get input, brainstorm ideas for, and plan for each of these three tracks. These events will also be critical opportunities for folks to connect, network, and build relationships. See below for more information about the first meet-up next week:
 
  • Social Justice Education Fair Campaigns Meet Up–this Tuesday, 8/5, 1pm!
    Are you organizing an education campaign? Or want to be? Come to this meet-up to network, share your goals, and collectively figure out how to use the Social Justice Education Fair this October 17th to build our campaigns and movement. 
     
    Please contact David or Shannon if you are interested in attending! It’s going to be a great time! 
Stay tuned for more information about upcoming meet-ups for the youth track (save the date for August 14th, 4-6pm) and parent track (details coming soon)!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair Organizing Committee
Website: tcedfair.org
               (612) 787-2272

CFP

Students demand, “Whose Diversity?” at the U of M

“Power concedes nothing without demand”

– Fredrick Douglass, quoted at the Whose Diversity? rally on the steps of Morrill Hall, Thursday, May 15.

This week, we’re highlighting the recent and exciting organizing work of Whose Diversity?, a collective of undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Minnesota. The group sees itself extending the struggles to challenge and transform the culture of exclusion and enclosure of Black, queer, Chicano, Indigenous, working class, and other minoritized spaces, knowledges, and people at the historically white institution. Even after threats by the University administration to sanction and even expel some of the organizers, the campaign continues to gain momentum.

whosediversity3
Images from Whose Diversity? website – whosediversity.weebly.com

Whose Diversity? say they’re taking their cues from such critical movements as the 1969 Morrill Hall takeover that led to the creation of African American and Chicano Studies and the 2005 General College Truth Movement, which sought to save the singular space that provided support for working class folks, older people, single mothers, and people of color to learn and get degrees at the U of M. More recently, Whose Diversity? has been influenced and continues the work of Whose University? during the 2010/2011 school year, which occupied Coffman Memorial Union with more than 700 college and high school students to  engage in critical dialogue around issues of access and representation at the institution.

At Classroom Struggle, we think it’s important to highlight this work, and situate it within a broader landscape of student organizing for substantive diversity in Twin Cities schools and universities. Struggles like the 2013 South High School walkout protesting attacks on the All Nations program and the more recent student organizing at Central High School in St. Paul protesting the criminalization of Black and Brown youth in schools, among others, illustrate how critical and necessary this work and the leadership of students is, at all levels of education.

Read below to find out more about the Whose Diversity? campaign.  Like their Facebook page to receive regular updates about their work and list of demands.

Continue reading Students demand, “Whose Diversity?” at the U of M

Social Justice in Education Awards – Nominations due by May 26th!

To nominate a student, youth worker, parent or caregiver, teacher, education support staff, administrator, or a community member for a Social Justice in Education Award, please visit here.

Finalists will be showcased here on Classroom Struggle, and winners of the award will win prizes and will be honored at the 2014 Twin Cities Social Justice Education Fair.

Nominations are due May 26th!

Awards Flier (1)
Nominate folks who are doing outstanding social justice work for K12 education by May 26th!

School and “Other People’s Children”: Some Personal Reflections

Written by Daniel Fox

My life has been feeling overwhelming recently. It makes me think about what we need to do to really support the kids in our increasingly diverse and segregated city schools who are going through things often objectively harder and newer to them than the busy-ness, pressures, and losses I have been facing as a white, college educated support staff. I’ve also been trying to think through an important question raised by Lisa Delpit: what does it mean to raise “other peoples’ children”, and how does this affect what we, as educators, do in our schools?

Other People's Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom by Lisa Delpit, 2006, The New Press
Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom by Lisa Delpit, 2006, The New Press

For me this question of race showed up in a real way in my senior year of high school, when me and my fellow students began to talk about what was then called the “achievement gap”. In a brief, painful reflection, it became clear that we as students–and teachers–knew that certain students were slated to go to prison, others to state schools, and others to fancy colleges. And not only did we all seem to know this tracking process at hauntingly early ages—five? ten?—but somehow this knowledge didn’t change anything. There seemed to be “nothing we could do”. I’m sure that teachers and students were not the only ones haunted by these seemingly pre-written scripts. Who could feel this harder and more painfully than parents? Raising a child yet feeling powerless to change the trajectory of their son or daughter in a brutal system beyond your control. You see and hear parents trying, or being told, to do all sorts of things in this situation. Discipline your children. Change schools. Send them to live with relatives in Iowa for the summer or forever. Get them into sports. Eliminate their freedom. Show them they are loved.

Continue reading School and “Other People’s Children”: Some Personal Reflections